Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them and Fantastic Beasts the Crimes of Grindelwald Original Screenplays by JK Rowling

Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them and the Crimes of Grindelwald original screenplays title image. Behind the text is a photo of the two covers

You may be aware that I love Harry Potter, I’ve loved the books for years and so when I saw these gorgeous hardback versions of the original scripts for the Fantastic Beasts movies I had to get them. I should probably say now that I haven’t actually seen the second one yet so reading the script book was basically a whole book of spoilers for the movie for me. I’m going on a plane soon so hoping they have the second one on there, it’ll make the four hours go a bit quicker.

These two books are the original screen play scripts for Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them and Fantastic Beasts The Crimes of Grindelwald. If you don’t know, these are the two movies based in the Harry Potter universe about Newt Scamander and set about fifty years before the Harry Potter series starts. He wrote the book Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them, which is one of the books in the Hogwarts reading list. The original Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them book was released for charity in the UK and there have been a few variations since, all of them including this written by JK Rowling.

I have a feeling that most people who buy these will probably be doing it to be part of a collection, like me, but I am going to include a bit of a review of them anyway. Don’t worry, no spoilers for the storyline at all and I’ve made sure that photos of any pages are early enough that they won’t give any storyline away or just don’t have any text on them.

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Blogmas 2018, Day 13: My Favourite Christmas Book and Advent Calendars!

On the left is a brightly coloured Christmas tree with Santa and bauble decorationsIn the Funko Pop advent calendar today I added one of the twins to the Weasley clan, I do like how the family is building up. The Holland and Barrett beauty advent calendar is helping increase my essential oils with a base product to add them to. I feel like I need to do some research into this, find out the best combinations, but until then I’ll have fun playing around!

How are we over half way to Christmas in advent? I started wrapping presents today and may have got a bit carried away with it. I always think that Instagram worthy presents look amazing but it would be a waste to buy all the ribbons and things, but then I remembered all of the ribbons I have from various Lush gifts over the years and now my floor may be a mess of ribbons, paper and tape. Also, would it be too much to add spare mini baubles? Asking for a friend 😉

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Book Review: The Last Bus to Woodstock by Colin Dexter

Despite having grown up watching the Inspector Morse TV series with John Thaw and Kevin Whately I realised I’ve never actually read any of the books. As it’s actually hot enough in the UK to feel like a proper summer it tends to mean I end up reading more and nine times out of ten it’s a detective novel so it felt like a good time to see how the books compare. My parents ave the complete set so I decided to start at the beginning and so read The Last Bus to Woodstock, which was first published in 1975.

I’m not sure how popular the Inspector Morse series is outside of the UK, or even in the UK, any more as there hasn’t been a new episode in over 15 years and it’s pretty much only shown on the digital ITV channels as repeats, though it is available on the ITV player if you live in the UK and want to watch some. If you haven’t heard of it, it’s a detective series based on these books by Colin Dexter. It’s based in Oxford and the main characters, Morse and sergeant Lewis, tend to end up with the more unusual murders. The kind that need some different ideas and only really make sense when explained at the end. They’re fairly quiet, as far as murder mysteries can be, and there’s lots of visits to pubs and conversations rather than fast paced action sequences and violence.

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Book Review: Terry Pratchett’s Discworld Colouring Book Illustrated by Paul Kidby

terry-pratchett's-discworld-colouring-book-paul-kidby-7.jpgFans of Terry Pratchett’s Discworld series will probably know that Paul Kidby was the illustrator for the covers of the later Discworld books. Since 2002 he’s been the artist who’s done the covers and art in various books related to the series. The Terry Pratchett’s Discworld Colouring Book is full of line art versions of some of his art. In total there are 77 pages to colour in, 78 if you include the title page and 16 pages of the original full colour art for the line art versions in the book.

This colouring book has images from various stories, along with excerpts from the books themselves on a lot of the pages next to the full page images and surrounded by their own art too so you have the link to the Terry Pratchett works there too. It’s been around for a couple of years, it was first published in 2016, but somehow I’ve missed it. I think it came out just after I’d bought a few too many colouring books and was taking a break but it’s in my collection now.

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A Mini Discworld Emporium Haul

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This is only a small haul but I love the things I got so much I think it deserves a post. For a long time I’ve been a fan of Terry Pratchett’s books, I think I read the first one when I was ten or eleven and since then I’ve reread them and the whole Discworld universe is one I love. If you don’t know the Discworld then this haul may seem slightly odd but hopefully you’ll enjoy it.

I was originally only getting something as a birthday present for someone, who I hope isn’t reading this but I’m not going to mention that thing just in case. When I was on the Discworld Emporium website I had a bit of a look around and found some things I wanted to get for myself, I was actually quite good as I could have spent a lot more with all the figures and things they do. I only got three things but I will be buying more from them in the future.

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Book Review: Death Knocks Twice (A Death in Paradise Novel) By Robert Thorogood

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I’ve already reviewed the first two Death in Paradise books based on the characters from the BBC TV series and by the show’s creator Robert Thorogood. This third book, Death Knocks Twice, was published last year and I’ve been meaning to read it but not quite got round to it until recently.

If you haven’t heard of the TV series this is based on it’s a similar style to Agatha Christie stories in that there’s a murder that seems impossible, often a locked room is involved, and a group of detectives in Saint Marie police station, a fictional Caribbean island, have to work out how it happened. The lead is a British detective in Richard Poole who has some unusual ways to solve the case. This time it’s a murder that looks like a suicide with no obvious motive. As the story unfolds pretty much every member of the family that lives in the estate where the murder happened becomes the main suspect so it keeps you guessing to the end.

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Book Review: Gently At A Gallop by Alan Hunter

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I’m not sure how popular George Gently as a TV series has been outside the UK but it was a fairly popular series that finished last year. It’s a detective show set in the 60s which revolves around Inspector George Gently (played by Martin Shaw) and his sergeant Bacchus (who isn’t in the books). I’ve loved the show and didn’t realise it was even based on a series of books until recently and, when I saw one in the library, I had to read one and see how it compared.

It seems like a lot of TV shows are based on books and it’s very rare for me to actually like both versions. There are often so many differences that one or the other stands out as better to me, whether it was the first version I saw or not. The main difference here, that I can see from one book anyway, is the lack of Bacchus (played by Lee Ingleby). I had read before finding this book that the character of George Gently himself was very different but I found that I could imagine the TV version when reading this. Maybe because this book is around the twentieth book in the series of forty six (if I’m remembering that number correctly) so he may have mellowed compared to what I’ve read on the character.

This review is about the book, I just thought that it would be worth doing a bit of an introduction including the TV show as that’s how I found the book in the first place and I think it may be the more well known incarnation.

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Book Review: Why Didn’t They Ask Evans? by Agatha Christie

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Title: Why Didn’t They Ask Evans?

Author: Agatha Christie

Year Written: 1934

Publisher, Year Published: Fontana, 1984

ISBN: 0-00-616606-7

My detective book summer has continued with another crime novel from Agatha Christie, though this time not a Poirot mystery. Why Didn’t they Ask Evans? Is about Bobby Jones, who witnesses someone die, though he is unaware at the time it’s a murder as he thinks he fell off a cliff, but as it’s an Agatha Christie it couldn’t be that simple. It is set in the early twentieth century, I can’t remember a date being mentioned but as it was originally written in 1934 I would assume around then, and is a quiet country setting as with a lot of her books, that hides a story of murder with twists and turns.

This book has been sat in my parents bookshelf so I thought, having enjoyed the other Agatha Christies I’ve read recently, I’d give it a go. It was adapted into a Miss Marple story fairly recently for TV so it may be familiar if you watch the ITV dramas but it’s not originally one of that series. I have to say I didn’t remember the storyline from the TV series so it was like reading it without any previous knowledge which was a bit of a change from the others.

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Book Review: A Meditation on Murder (A Death in Paradise Novel) by Robert Thorogood

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Title: A Meditation on Murder

Author: Robert Thorogood

Publisher, Date: Harlequin MIRA, 2015

ISBN: 978-1-848-45371-5

Until a recent trip to the library I didn’t even know that there were books based on the Death in Paradise TV show from the BBC. As it’s one I love and I’m on a bit of a detective novels kick at the moment I thought I’d give it a go. It’s also the perfect book for the recent heat here in the UK, with its setting of Saint-Marie, a fictional island in the Caribbean. After a bit of a look online it turns out A Meditation on Murder was the first Death in Paradise novel so it’s a great one to start with.

I was interested, going into this, to see how close it comes to the actual TV series and characters, also which of the characters it was written about as there have been a few combinations over the series. Being written by the creator of the show, Robert Thorogood, I was hoping it would be close and, to me, it doesn’t disappoint.

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Book Review: The Labours of Hercules by Agatha Christie

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Another Agatha Christie book, this is from a series of ten that Penguin published that she chose herself as favourites. I already reviewed Death on the Nile, another from this series, and this has the same green cover that the Penguin Crime books do. It’s The Labours of Hercules by Agatha Christie, a book of twelve short stories about Hercule Poirot. Each one is inspired by one of the Labours of Hercules, the classic book about the Greek myths of Hercules.

This edition was published in 1955 (it’s the reprint, he original Penguin was in 1953) but as it’s one of the more well known Agatha Christie books and part of the Poirot series it has been published many times over the years. Hercule Poirot is one of Agatha Christie’s more famous characters and there are TV adaptations of all of the stories, though I don’t remember all of these being made. Each of the stories is short, ranging from around 15 to 30 pages, and covers a wide range of mysteries from dog kidnapping to murder.

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